Imagine for a second you can’t process fear. Sounds awesome, right? Public speaking would be a piece of cake, and we would walk, not run, up the basement stairs after flicking off the lights. At the same time, we might not think twice about eating puffer-fish sushi for a light snack or piggybacking on a Grizzly bear. Thankfully, humans are hardwired to automatically respond to dangerous events in ways that best promote survival. At the sight or sound of a perceived harmful event, our bodies will trigger its “fight-or-flight” response, giving us increased strength and speed in anticipation of fighting or running. The same part of our brain that processes and reacts to fear is also responsible for a wide range of other emotional reactions including love, amusement, grief, shock, anxiety, and sadness to name a few. Emotions are strong motivators, and in turn, drive action. It should come as no surprise then that emotion is used to influence behavior, and is one...

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Most of us are already aware of the dangers associated with driving. Winter driving, however, presents us with more serious risks and unique challenges. The likelihood of being involved in a vehicle incident greatly increases during the colder months. According to Transportation Alberta, in 2013, slush, snow or ice was involved in 16.6% of fatal collisions and 27.3% of non-fatal injury collisions (Source: Transportation Alberta). Not to worry. There are many precautions you can take to combat the precarious winter conditions. Although not all incidents can be avoided, preparation is the key to reducing the risks of the road in wintertime. It’s never too early to start preparing your company and crew for winter. Here are some simple guidelines you can communicate to your team. Journey Planning Planning your journey in advance is a fundamental, but often overlooked, practice that can be easily implemented. It is important to know where you are going and to consider all potential risks. Map the route you...

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Journey Management can mean many things to different people and organizations. In its simplest form, it's a responsibility we all have to analyze driving situations and manage impending risk before we get behind the wheel of our vehicle, turn the key, and drive. It should come as no surprise that driving is one of the riskiest activities we do in our professional and personal lives. According to the World Health Organization’s (WHO) most recent Global Road Safety report, road traffic injuries result in approximately 35,000 fatalities each year throughout Canada and the United States, averaging 9.1 fatalities per 100,000 people (1). Globally, this average is 19.1 per 100,000 people, higher than diabetes, stomach cancer, and alcohol and drug disorders to name a few (2). In the workplace, motor vehicle-related incidents are consistently the leading cause of work-related fatalities. In the United States, 36% of all workplace fatalities are associated with motor vehicles (3). A Close Call and Near Miss Here is a personal...

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