43 post(s)

Before I joined Telelink Emergency Response Centre several years ago, I had never heard of Journey Management, and my idea of a Trip Risk Assessment was asking myself how many coffees I would need to get to where I was driving. In the sales profession, however, you are only as good as what you know. If you don’t understand your buyers’ struggles and business in a way that makes you valuable, you don’t deserve their attention. (Before reading any further, if you aren’t sure what Journey Management is - check out this quick blog. It is commonplace in the energy industry, and now starting to catch on in other industries. It not only saves lives, it makes complete fiscal sense which is where this post is going.) Over the last several years I have spent more time talking about Journey Management and driver safety than talking about my dogs - and I spend an obscene amount of time talking about my dogs. Most...

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I’m sure you must be thinking, “There is no way magic, mind reading and lone workers in the utility industry have anything in common.”. I know it sounds like an illusion, but there is indeed a common thread. A couple of weeks ago, I attended the Safety2017 conference in Denver put off by the American Society of Safety Engineers. (Sidenote, this year’s show was fantastic and busier than ever, so kudos to the organizers!) The keynote speaker for the luncheon on the last day was Vinh Glang, an entrepreneur and highly entertaining presenter who used magic as a metaphor to explain three essential truths to achieving success. As someone who has attended many conferences and sat through many keynotes staring at my empty plate willing dessert to arrive, I admit, I was skeptical of getting much value out of this one. I could not have been more wrong. Vinh’s presentation offered some valuable lessons that apply to success, and safety. His explanation of...

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Recently, one of our team members, Laura Fudge, attended the 2016 Canadian Society of Safety Engineering conference. Here is the first part of her account of the event. This year marks the third year in a row I have attended the annual conference for the Canadian Society of Safety Engineering (CSSE), which took place in Vancouver, British Columbia, from September 18th to the 21st. As a supplier of employee monitoring and emergency response solutions through Telelink's emergency response centre, I initially started attending the conference as a way of networking and gaining a deeper understanding of the challenges safety professionals faced with lone workers, drivers and mitigating losses during an emergency event. This year, there were several sessions that shared some great insights and lessons learned from some of the world’s most safety-focused organizations. It would be impossible for me to highlight everything I learned, but let me share a few tidbits that really hit home with me. The BC Safety Authority, joined...

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While having emergency and safety procedures are vital for all businesses and mandatory for most, there is not much incentive to ensure their continued maintenance. As time passes, a company’s structure will be rearranged - employees will be assigned to new roles, and it’s reasonable to assume some staff turnover. The excitement may wear off, but it’s vitally important to keep a company’s emergency response plan up to date. Even with procedures in place, the absence of a few people can dramatically alter the effectiveness of a response. What Should My Emergency Plan Contain? A critical part of an emergency response plan is a risk assessment, when is intended to identify potential hazards, as well as analyze the results of a hazard occurring. Such hazards could run the gamut from tornado, hurricane, or some other act of nature, to incidents like gas leaks and burst pipes, to name a few. When someone thinks of creating an emergency response plan, they may primarily think...

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The phrase “Incident Command System” may sound complicated without context, but it has emerged over the last 50 years to be the standard for the command, control, and coordination of emergency response efforts. Here in Newfoundland, ICS training is performed through Fire & Emergency Services, and all municipalities are required to not only be trained in the system but also to have an Emergency Management Plan in place. Our curiosity about the system was stoked when we noticed that many of our emergency-centric clients use ICS. Here’s what we found out. What is ICS? ICS is a standardized on-scene incident management concept designed specifically to allow responders to adapt an integrated organizational structure equal to the complexity and demands of any single incident or multiple incidents without being hindered by jurisdictional boundaries. ICS is normally structured to facilitate activities in five major functional areas: command, operations, planning, logistics, intelligence & investigations, and finance & administration. The purpose of ICS is to enable incident...

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You may be familiar with the phrase SaaS - that is, Software as a Service. For a SaaS product, businesses pay developers for access to their cloud-based software platform, usually a web application. From Asana to Zapier, Proposify to Salesforce, SaaS applications have changed the way that many of us do our jobs; they offer autonomy and convenience through the use of a subscription model, which is often a fraction of the cost of buying software outright. What is MaaS? Of course, the “as-a-service” model is not only limited to software products. For example, Monitoring as a Service, or MaaS, allows for monitoring services without needing to create a monitoring infrastructure specific to the company. With MaaS, alerts are generated by the local device or sensor, which are then funneled into a monitoring platform; a mandated response procedure is then followed on a 24/7 basis. A MaaS model can easily be applied to a number of technologies, including telematics, lone worker devices, healthcare...

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When you think of someone who is a lone worker, someone working by themselves in the field or another inaccessible area may spring to mind. While this would certainly qualify as an example of a lone worker, it limits the scope of who may be considered one. Who is a Lone Worker? A lone worker is anyone who works by themselves without any direct supervision. A lot of companies believe that lone workers are only people working who are completely alone, needing a direct line of contact in the event of an unexpected occurrence. However, many legislative bodies have a different definition. They consider a lone worker to be anyone who is working without direct supervision from someone else in their company. For example, if an employee were to visit a customer’s job site, even if there is another person there, they would work for a different company. Hence, the visiting employee is without direct supervision, and thus would qualify as a lone...

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Journey Management is a field that encapsulates many different industries, but depending on specific needs there may not be a one-size-fits-all solution. Rather than having companies worry about things that may not be applicable to them, a Trip Risk Assessment is conducted for every specific journey. While drivers may be comfortable with getting to and from their destination, there are a number of factors that may be out of their control, such as weather and road conditions. What is a Trip Risk Assessment? A Trip Risk Assessment is a process outlining any potential hazards an employee may encounter while on a journey, but it’s not only limited to ensuring that they get from point A to point B safely. All steps of the journey are considered, such as loading and unloading materials, getting into and exiting the vehicle, and ensuring the vehicle is properly maintained. When the steps are defined, a list of potential hazards is developed, with preventative measures to avoid them....

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When Telelink opened its doors in St. John’s Newfoundland over 50 years ago, little did we know how technology would change our operations and the types of services we offer. To meet the growing demand for safety monitoring services and technology, Telelink has evolved from a traditional call centre to a full-scale safety monitoring technology and services provider. A critical component of Telelink’s evolution has been the development of lone worker monitoring services, followed by journey management and emergency response communication services. Today, emergency and safety services account for about 50% of what we do. Telelink has managed over 4,000,000 journeys to date - up to 2,000 each day! In a discussion about the tools you need for journey management, we start with a look at the evolving technology. 1. Mobile Apps There’s been an explosion in the development and use of apps over the last few years, and Journey Management is no exception. There are a number of Journey Management apps on...

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What is Journey Management? Different organizations may define Journey Management in different ways, but at its core the objective of Journey Management is to eliminate driving related incidents that bring harm to people and property. Organizations can minimize this potential injury and damage! What sets Journey Management apart from other employee and asset monitoring programs is its preventative nature. Journey Management is focused on risk mitigation, on preventing incidents before they happen. The 5 Fundamental Components of a Journey Management Program 1. Journey Management Policy & Procedure What Constitutes a Journey? When developing a Journey Management policy the first thing to do is to define what constitutes a journey: How do you categorize a journey for your employees? How a journey is defined has to make sense for your company and operations. Is there a minimum distance requirement? Is it defined by geographical areas? It’s important to clearly define what constitutes a journey in your organization, so your employees know when to book...

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